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Wednesday, 5 October 2016

☀ Sunday's Child: Heroines Born on Different Days of the Week [1] - Rosemary Morris

Thank you for joining us on the Virtual Book Tour for Sunday's Child, an Historical Romance by (first published 12 June 2012; this second edition , Books We Love Ltd., 229 pages).

This is the first book in the Heroines Born on Different Days of the Week series.

PREVIEW: Check out the book's synopsis and exclusive excerpt below. Read the Prologue and the first three chapters with Amazon Look Inside.

Sunday's Child is FREE on Kindle Unlimited and Kindle Owner's Lending Library.

Author Rosemary Morris will be awarding a $20 Amazon/BN gift card to a randomly drawn winner via Rafflecopter during the tour.   Please do take part: comment on our post and follow the tour where you will be able to read other exclusive excerpts (☀).


Synopsis | Teaser | The Series | About the Author | Giveaway & Tour Stops

Synopsis

Georgianne Whitley’s beloved father and brothers died in the war against Napoleon Bonaparte. While she is grieving for them, she must deal with her unpredictable mother’s sorrow, and her younger sisters’ situation caused by it.

Georgianne’s problems increase when the arrogant, wealthy but elderly Earl of Pennington, proposes marriage to her for the sole purpose of being provided with an heir. At first she is tempted by his proposal, but something is not quite right about him. She rejects him not suspecting it will lead to unwelcome repercussions.

Teaser: Exclusive Excerpt

After the gentlemen left, Georgianne glanced at her cousin. She had seen little of her since Sarah yielded to the family’s persuasion to marry Wilfred Stanton, heir to his uncle, the Earl of Pennington.
     Despite her reluctance to leave home because of her mamma’s unfortunate habit, and extravagant displays of grief over the loss of her husband and sons, Georgianne agreed to visit her cousin Sarah, who suffered from melancholy after the birth of a son.
     Anxious for her mamma and two younger sisters, she reminded herself Whitley Manor—on the southern outskirts of Cousin Stanton’s Hertfordshire parish—lay a mere fifteen minutes away by carriage.
     “Are you daydreaming, Cousin?”
     Georgianne pretended to be busy untangling another strand of embroidery thread. “No.”
     “Did I tell you Papa wants Tarrant to resign from the army now he is Papa’s heir?” Sarah’s needle flashed in and out of her work.
     “Yes, several times.” Georgianne shivered, stretched her hands toward the fire, and fought a losing battle with the draughts in the old vicarage.
     “Are you not interested in dear Tarrant?”
     Georgianne bent her head. Once, she had wanted to marry a military man. However, after the loss of her father and brothers, she changed her mind for fear death might snatch him from her, either on the battlefield or as a result of wounds sustained in combat. She shook her head, remembering the dreams she harboured three years earlier when she last saw Major Tarrant. How her life had altered since then. Most of the time, she lived cloistered at home in reduced—yet not impoverished—circumstances. She spent her life in an endless round of mending and embroidery, both of which she detested. Her only escape from this drab existence consisted of daily walks, rides, or reading her beloved books. A yawn escaped her. Oh, the tedium of her days at home.
     “You have not answered my question.”
     Georgianne gathered her thoughts. “Yes, Sarah, I am interested in Major Tarrant. After all, we have known each other since we were in the nursery.”

Sunday's Child
Available NOW!

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The Series: Heroines Born on Different Days of the Week

|| [2] || [3] ||

All titles in the series are FREE on Kindle Unlimited and Kindle Owner's Lending Library.

Click on the book cover to Look Inside the book on Amazon and read an excerpt.

Monday's Child [2]

In March 1815, Napoleon Bonaparte escaped from exile in Elba. In Brussels, 18 year-old Helen Whitley, knows that war with France between Britain and her allies, is inevitable.

A talented artist, Helen is aware of the anxiety and fear underlying the balls, breakfasts, parties, picnics and soirees, held by the British. In an attic, she paints scenes and portraits in which she captures the realities and emotions of daily life during the hundred days before the Battle of Waterloo.

While Helen lives with her sister and wealthy brother-in-law, Major Tarrant, she waits for Major, Viscount Langley, to arrive in Brussels and propose marriage. Langley, who serves in the same regiment as Tarrant, is her brother-in-law’s closest friend, so Tarrant and her sister have no objection to the match.

Helen is grateful to her brother-in-law for including her in his household. Nevertheless, she regrets being dependent on his generosity, so she looks forward to being mistress of Langley’s heart and home.

Before Langley leaves England to join his regiment, he visits his ancestral home, to inform his parents that he intends to marry Helen. Yet, when he arrives in Brussels to join his regiment, he does not propose marriage to Helen, and her pride does not allow her to reveal the misery caused by Langley’s rejection.

[Published 14 October 2016, 304 pages]

Tuesday's Child [3]

Harriet Stanton followed the drum until the deaths of her husband and father, army officers in the war against Napoleon Bonaparte. Destitute, on the verge of starvation, she returns to England, with her three-year old son, Arthur.

Although she has never met her father-in-law, the Earl of Pennington, with whom her late husband had cut all ties, for Arthur’s sake, Harriet decides to ask Pennington for help.

Turned away from his London house by servants, she is rescued by Georgianne Tarrant, who founded an institution to help soldiers’ widows and orphans. Desperate for an heir, the earl welcomes Harriet, and Arthur whose every wish he grants.

At first, Harriet is grateful to her father-in-law, but, as time goes on she is locked in a silent battle to control Arthur, who has tantrums if he is denied anything.

After Pennington refuses his permission for Arthur to swim in the lake, Arthur defies him. About to drown, he is rescued by charismatic Dominic, Reverend Markham, the Earl and Countess Faucon’s son.

At the lakeside, Dominic meets Harriet. She is so dainty that his immediate impression is of a fairy. Despite her appearance, he is mistaken. Harriet is not a pampered lady by birth. During brutal campaigns, she milked goats and cooked over camp fires.

[Published 3 September 2016, 256 pages]

About the Author

I write historical fiction, so I am fortunate to be only a 20 minute train journey from London, which offers so many possibilities for research about times past. So many things spark my imagination. During the last two years I took an open tour bus ride around London. Amongst the sky scrapers and modern buildings Old London can be discovered, including the street which J.K.Rowling used as a model for Diagon Alley in her Harry Potter series.

For as long as I can remember, I enjoyed studying history, reading historical non-fiction, historical fiction and its sub-genres. I enjoy novels in which the characters’ behaviour is appropriate for the era in which they lived.

The more I read the more fascinated I become, and the more aware of the gulf between historical periods and my own. Our ancestors shared the same emotions as we do, but their attitudes and way of life were different to ours. One of the most striking examples is the position of women and children in society in bygone ages.

I don’t think it is possible for a novelist to be 100% accurate about life in former ages. However, the characters in my novels are of their time, not ones dressed in costume who behave like 21st century women. Of course, it is almost impossible to completely understand our ancestors, but through extensive research I ensure my characters observe the social etiquette of their lives and times.

My previously published novels, set in the early 18th century and in the ever popular Regency era, and my previously unpublished historical fiction will be published by Books We Love as e-book editions and paper books.

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Giveaway and Tour Stops

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5 comments:

  1. Congrats on the tour and thanks for the chance to win :)

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  2. I really like the concept for this series. It sounds really good. Thanks for sharing and for the giveaway chance too.

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  3. Great teaser, sounds like a book I'll enjoy reading. Thanks for sharing :)

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  4. Thank you for being my host. And thank you Marcy and Victoria for your kind comments. At the moment, I'm writing Wednesday's Child. The heroine, an orphan, is a character in Sunday's Child. Her grandmother, brings her up to be a submissive young lady. When Amelia's grandmother dies, she must, in modern terms, learn to stand on her own two feet.

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